Site Topology Planning and Taxonomies

In the previous article SharePoint Site Topology Planning I discussed some of the technical implications of organizing the the sites within one or more applications, site collections, and sub-sites.  The article started to get pretty long so I decided to save the taxonomy part of the discussion for a separate article.

Organizing Sites

In the previous article I addressed different types of content and using that to help segment the sites across applications and site collections.  Within a given application it is possible to provide some meaningful segmentation by configuring managed paths. 

For example, you may segment collaboration sites with the following url structure:

  • http://collaborate.company.com – Collaboration Application
    • /Communities – Communities of Practice Managed Path
      • /Proposals – Proposal Community of Practice Site Collection
      • /Procurement -  Procurement Community of Practice Site Collection
    • /Projects – Projects Managed Path
      • /Alpha – Alpha Project Site Collection
      • /Omega – Omega Project Site Collection

Organizational Hierarchies

Most people understand hierarchies, and most businesses (at least in the west) have been organized in hierarchies for many years.  It is natural for people to think of their organization in this manner, but this may not be the best way to plan for the topology of your sites.

Traditional Intranets tend to go from the largest organizational unit down to the smallest.  There may be multiple divisions, with multiple business units, with multiple departments, with multiple teams, with people that actually do the work.  Sites or portals that go 5 or more levels deep can become very difficult to manage and even harder to use.  Modern businesses need to remain agile with teams always being redefined, combined and split up.  In  most situations it is a good idea to fight the hierarchy tendencies and strive for a flatter structure. 

From a SharePoint perspective a flatter structure with more site collections will make it easier to reorganize sites and structure versus a single site collection with 5+ sub-site layers deep.  As previously discussed Site Collections can be backed up and restored with a high level of fidelity (completeness) compared to a sub-site’s export and import options.  The key to usability and manageability is to find the right amount of segmentation and site collection structure.

Finding Sites and Content in a Flat World

An alternative to a rigid hierarchy is adopting flexible taxonomies with tagging.  Tagging provides a flexible and dynamic method of describing the content and sites that can evolve over time.  A great example of this is a site like StackOverflow compared with the rigid structure of the MSDN/TechNet Forums. The flat structure decreases the chance of duplication and provides new opportunities to view the data in new and unique ways. 

The SharePoint 2010 system full supports tagging without the need for custom or third party add-on components.  I fully expect that these will be a popular feature within the new version. 

Summary

Following the guidance between the two articles you should be able to properly plan your site topology.  Assumptions and business decisions do change, but if you establish the right level of granularity with applications and site collections you will be able to migrate and relocate things as needed.

Related Posts

Tags: , , ,

Leave a Comment